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Quarta-feira, 13/11/2002
Só pensam naquilo
Eduardo Carvalho

Só pensam naquilo

Com esse nome, mesmo antes de assistir, a gente - que, uma ou duas vezes na vida, já assistiu a um episódio isolado de seriados americanos - sabe que não presta. Mas só a gente. Porque, de menininhas deslumbradas de 14 anos a velhas insatisfeitas de 70, muita gente está achando graça nesse Sex and The City. É curioso como o apelo barato de um estilo de vida ridiculamente desinteressante seduz tanta gente. A fórmula do programa é simples e já cansou - tanto que, com esse nome, nem preciso dizer qual é.

O que me incomoda é a insistência obsessiva num assunto único. E a necessidade quase absoluta de fazer piadas apenas relacionadas a sexo - que são sempre as mesmas. E, depois, relações afetivas serem tratadas frigidamente por homossexuais e ninfomaníacas, como se todo mundo fosse iguais e eles. É preciso a vida estar mundo desinteressante para que sexo se torne o assunto principal. E, pelo jeito, para muita gente está.

Lee Siegel, na The New Republic, trata o assunto com competência admirável:

"The problem is that Sex and the City, once it mustered a striking frankness on the tube about urban men and women, has gone about squandering it. Instead of plunging into all the strange new present-day configurations of sex and emotion, the series has proceeded to divide sex from emotion. There is an abundance of fucking in Sex and the City, but it is the sort of fucking you did years ago, when you were very young, lying on the bed and cavorting in the head. As the series rolled along, you became aware of a damning artifice, an un-mimetic quality startling in a series that was supposed to be a candid look at urban life: none of these women is hurt by sex.

"(...)Every episode ritualistically has several scenes, usually set in restaurants over a meal, in which the women get together and talk about their romantic situations. But rather than talk about their adventures in terms of feelings or mental states, poignantly or angrily or comically, they speak about them almost exclusively in terms of sex. When they are not talking about "the classic dating ritual: the blow-job tug-of-war," or about "fucking your brains out," they are quipping, "If your friends won't go down on you, who will?" and discoursing interminably on anal intercourse.

"(...)It is not shocking to see women portrayed--though in comic caricature--talking the way women, when they are alone with each other, do talk sometimes (or so I assume), or to have part of the reality of female desire acknowledged on the small screen. What is startling is that for these smart, canny, emotionally alive women, pretty much every relationship comes down to the quest for sex--for perfect sex--as an end in itself. (...) Now, a part of the reason for the show's portrayal of women seeking sex for sex's sake is that the series' two creators, Darren Star and Michael Patrick King, are gay. On this level, Sex and the City is part of a long imaginative streak in popular art, a trend that includes Cole Porter and Lorenz Hart and George Cukor and Rock Hudson and most of the writers of the 1970s series Bewitched and many other gay figures whose portrayals of heterosexual life brilliantly subverted heterosexual conventions even as they were providing models for (unwitting) straight boys and girls. But there is a quality to Sex and the City's subversions that is more bitter than playful, an element that is almost vindictive."

Eduardo Carvalho
13/11/2002 às 21h35

 

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